EDC Checklist

Discussion in 'Personal EDC' started by EDCP-MIKE, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Hartigan

    Hartigan
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Scholar

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    1,979
    Yes that's it :cool:.


    Right front pocket:


    Knife clipped in pocket
    Slim wallet

    Fifth pocket:

    from time to time a AloxCadet

    Left front pocket:

    Light and/or keys with a OHT and small light clipped with dangler in pocket.
    from time to time a "knuck" (more like a "worriestone")

    Right rear pocket:

    Phone (taking it out when sitting ;))

    Left rear pocket:

    Hanky

    Right wrist:

    from time to time a bracelet or a paracordbracelet

    Left Wrist:

    watch

    Jacket:

    CarKey, second knife, Lighter, "bigger Light"

    and all the other "usefull" stuff in my BAG ;)
     
    bigfoot, Blacksheep and murrydan like this.
  2. A4VC

    A4VC
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Scholar

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    1,666
    NOSE & EARS: Glasses
     
    bigfoot likes this.
  3. Revs

    Revs
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Journeyman

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    209
    I usually have two loadouts. Work and weekends.

    Work:
    Mini Grip in right front pocket with Burt's Bees and Red Bull snuff.
    Recycled Firefighter Rookie in left front pocket
    Vic Spirit X on belt at 9 o'clock.
    Fairly Backpacker around neck on paracord necklace
    keys clipped to belt loop at 3 o'clock
    Pen in left chest pocket
    Streamlight Microstream and mini pry bar in right chest pocket.

    Carry a backpack with me daily to work with a water bottle, GSI cup, Buff, schemagh, sporks, chopsticks, spare pen, Shaerks Knives Little Mook, CC Breacher Bar occasionally, and whatever I need for lunch that day. Now I have a Rush12, I plan on adding a mylar blanket and signal mirror again. Forgot, I have a First Aid kit in the bag, as well.

    Weekend
    Mini Grip in right front pocket.
    Wallet in left front pocket
    Triple Deuces Cuchillo or Fatty Wharncliff at the 10 o'clock.
    Keys clipped to belt loop at the 3 o'clock.
    Pen and light, if carried, either in right rear pocket or shirt pocket if available.

    Don't usually carry a pack on weekends unless I plan on hiking.

    Work truck is equipped with 13 fire packs all with flares and water after it stops freezing. Usually have at least a case of MREs in it, a well. 3 chainsaws with a spare powerhead, half dozen shovels, assorted other hand tools, and larger first aid kit. And, after it stops freezing, 35 gallons of fresh water. While freezing, 5 gallon water cooler and 5 gallon cubee of water.
     
  4. Polonium9

    Polonium9
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Apprentice

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    193
    Front left pocket: Pen (either InkJoy 1.0mm, generic gel pen, Platinum Preppy, Precise V7 or Pilot G2), Alox Cadet on knockoff tec dangler, keychain (titanium bottle opener, streamlight microstream, house, car, mail key, pill container, partial guide line fob with a GITD craft bead, fun usb light from China), General Snus. I also painted the inner rim of the Streamlight with GITD nail polish (went on sale last year at target after Halloween)

    Front right pocket: Wallet (Flowfold Vanguard), Phone (iPhone SE), and, maybe, a small multitool (Leatherman Squirt PS4) in my coin pocket.

    Back left pocket: Homemade notepad holder with notepad
     
    backwater-otter and mctacticool like this.
  5. backwater-otter

    backwater-otter
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Grand Master

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    8,190
    You signature!!!! :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D It's amazing!!!!
     
  6. dmak

    dmak
    Expand Collapse
    into the wild i go, let fortune assist the daring
    Staff Member Global Mod

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    13,308
    On body checklist is as follows.

    - Firearm with spare mag
    - Folding knife
    - Fixed knife
    - Multitool
    - Flashlight
    - Lighter
    - Wallet
    - Handkerchief
    - Phone with BT Headphones
    - Pen
    - Comb
    - Keys

    Luck is the by-product of preparation and opportunity colliding. Stay Lucky!
     
    nolaradio likes this.
  7. charlie fox

    charlie fox
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Scholar

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2014
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    667
    Typical EDC

    Right front pocket: Wallet with ID, CCWs, medical cards and debit/credit cards (cash? Hahahaha!), SAK Classic, Space Pen and some flavor of 3-4" folder.
    Right rear pocket: Handkerchief and Leatherman Juice S2
    Left rear pocket: empty
    Left front pocket: homemade pouch with Nitecore MT1C and spare magazine
    Belt line at 4 o'clock: Kahr CM9 either IWB or OWB depending on mode of dress.
     
  8. moostapha

    moostapha
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Master

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    3,409
    I like this idea, but it's really easy to get carried away. I don't agree with people like nutnfancy that bigger/heavier gear is always a negative because you just won't carry it. But there is definitely a balance that everyone has to achieve based on their perceived risk, their environment, their lifestyle, etc..

    ITS Tactical has been writing a few EDC articles baed on the "level up" concept. The basic idea is that each level gets you to the next until you've got all your stuff. It's the same idea as a pistol being used to fight your way to a rilfe, except a little more expansive and a little more sane.

    So, I'd suggest a slight modification to incorporate those ideas, based on the survival rule of 3...aka, what will kill you at different orders of magnitude of time.

    So, what kills you? 3 hours without shelter, 3 days without water, 3 weeks without food. I'd add 3 months without companionship, 3 years without society, 3 seconds without hope, and 3 minutes without blood. Obviously, all of those times are kind of general. A sane, level-based EDC can solve (or at least increase survivability) most of those issues at appropriate levels.

    Three seconds without hope:
    This is all about mindset. If a building comes down around you, you open a stairwell to a fire, or shots ring out in the mall...you have very little time to get your wits about you. Stoic fear-setting or red teaming your life (or similar exercises) as well as general awareness and practicing survival skills will give you the confidence to act and the experience (even if simulated) to have some idea what to do. Fortunately, experience and mental toughness is something you can always have with you. Unfortunately, it takes a good bit of investment to really develop it.

    When the green flag drops, the bullsh*t stops, and you're off to the races. And the faster you can regain your hope that you have the knowledge and skills to prevail, the better your chances.

    Three minutes without blood:
    Bleeding out sucks. Watching someone you love bleed out sucks even more. Assuming you keep/have hope, knowledge, and skills, this is where gear comes into play first. And there are a few things you should have on you to deal with you or someone you've chosen to protect losing all their blood. The first step of on-body carry is the stuff to end an immediate threat (weapons to respond to violence, tools to get someone out of a burning car, etc.), repair the damage that threat did before you can react (truama medicine), and evacuate the casualty (communication, transportation). A lot of this stuff cannot be improvised, so it should be where you can get it and use it within, at most, minutes. That means on-body. (a bag you literally always have counts)

    Three hours without shelter:
    Freezing to death sucks. Dying of heat stroke sucks too. Clothing appropriate to your climate with an eye toward potential disasters is the first line of defense. The second would be shelter to protect you from heat, cold, wind, and water. But, you've got a little time. Even in a downpour of freezing rain or a blizard, you've got a little time before you succumb to the elements, so the more extreme stuff doesn't necessarily need to be on you. It just needs to be where you can get it within a couple/few hours. For most people in the USA who live a primarily driving-focused life, a car is a great place to store this stuff. If you're traveling on public transit, a bag that goes with you but doesn't necessarily get worn all the time is an option.

    Three days without water:
    Dying of dehydration sucks. Getting sick because you haven't washed anything sucks too. If you want to carry water because of convenience, go for it. I do that some of the time for normal days and have at least some in my get hom and bug out kits. But, from a survival standpoint, it's more important that you have a sustainable source of water to survive and wash your body, clothing, and food source without having to rely on clan water coming out of the faucet. That level is not an immediate concern. And unless you live in a desert, there is water around. Having a way to filter and serilize it is the important thing. But the first place you need it is in a 72-hour kit, at home, or in your bugout location, as appropriate to your life. With the recent hurricanes in the southeast, someone posted something funny to facebook: "you survive on 3 cokes per day, and all of a sudden you're buying water by the pallet." Water in your EDC bag or on your person is about comfort and maintaining hope, not survival. Water treatment stuff is about survival, but you don't need it in your EDC unless you just want it.

    Three weeks without food:
    Starving to death sucks. Not being able to provide for the people you care about sucks more. But, again, most people can go a lot longer than they think they can without eating. There have been a few case studies of severely obese people fasting (only vitamins and water) for over a year with no ill health effects. That being said, being well fed does play into hope. And obviously long term survival. With those hurricanes, losing power for a day or so, it was really nice to be able to boil some water and eat something approaching real food. But, it was at home. Outside of your house, trying to get home or to your bugout location in a reasonable time frame, the biggest effect of food is on morale. And if you're talking about the sacle of weeks, the gear and ability to obtain food (hunting, gardening, etc.) is more important than actual stored food. Because...if you get to this point, you're in it for a while.

    Three months without companionship:
    Being alone sucks. Psychologists have well-documented the effects of isolation on humans. This isn't so much a gear thing (though signaling could come into play) as it is a general mindset thing. If your plan is to take your INCH bag out into the woods and live as a hermit....I seriously question your priorities. The big thing here, though, is that whatever preparations you're making, whatever lifestyle you live (single, married, MGTOW, etc.), you must prepare to help other people. You must be willing and able to form a little group. If nothing else, the wolves will be at your door eventually. And one guy with all the rifles in the world will eventually wind up a supply depot for 4 guys who want his stuff.

    Three years without society:
    The vast majority of human history sucked. We created society for a reason. And things will come back eventually. It might not look the same. If things get bad enough, it probably won't. People thought the US Civil War was the end of the world. People thought the Arab Spring was the end of the world. Things kept going. Even if it's smaller, even if things get really bad, building, rebuilding, or joining a community should be your end goal, not walking out into the woods and living out your days with no thought to the future. This also means that you may be held accountable for anything you do, at least by yourself and your peers.

    With all that in mind....here's the way I think about EDC...please note that everything is dependent on local laws and your skills. A firearm in an untrained hand isn't much use. A decompression needle in an unskilled hand is lible to cause more harm than good. But the skills are available to anyone who wants to make the investment in themselves. Each level adds capabilities and resupplies and reinforces the lower levels to put you in an even better situation.

    Non-corporeal: Level 0
    • Training & Skills (applicable to gear, local expected conditions/threats, etc.)
    • Mindset
    • Hope

    On-body: Level 1
    • Medical: tourniquet, PPE, gauze (possibly hemostatic), pressure dressing, NPA, decompression needle
    • Defense: handgun > knife > OC spray > impact weapons, IMHO
    • Tools: general use based on your life and skills, to include a knife
    • Illumination: flashlight(s). You can't treat, fight, or escape if you can't see.
    • E&E/Entry tools: locked doors when you need to evacuate suck.
    • Communication: cel phone, sharpie, pen
    • Transportation: vehicle keys, uber app, transit card/coins, etc.
    • Normal stuff you actually need very often: IDs, cash, cards, keys, tablet, work stuff, etc.

    Bag: Level 2 - not necessarily carried all the time, but avialable within a couple hours
    • Independent communication/signaling: signal mirror, flares, marker panels, non-network radio
    • Basic Shelter: clothing appropriate to extremes of local climate, heat source
    • Morale items: food, water, soda, coffee, etc. as weight will allow. It doesn't need to keep you alive, it needs to keep you happy. A candy bar goes a long way when you're talking about hours.
    • Resupply for lower level: more ammo, medical gear, batteries, cash...stuff to resupply your on-body gear that you used to get there if it's not on you.
    • Reinforcement for lower level: Maybe a bigger gun, more accessible trauma gear, etc.. Basically, the stuff you would carry on body if not constrained by societal norms or SAWC, still within reason, since you'll live with this bag a lot of the time.
    • Life stuff: laptop, tablet, work documents, etc..

    Vehicle: Level 3 - some kind of stash/cache spot would work for people who don't drive as much
    • Navigation: GPS, maps, compass...to find alternate routes to the next level or full-on evacuation.
    • Communication: longer-range backup to cel-phone, larger signaling devices, something to mark the location, etc.
    • Shelter: bivvies, tarps, heat source, etc.. Still light weight, so you won't ditch it, but enough to live in/at that vehicle/cache for a while even in bad conditions.
    • Food/Water: Still primarily a morale concern, but snce SAWC are looser, you could stop for camp coffee or a meal before you move on if you have the time and inclination. Some way to filter & treat water is a good idea, since you can't carry enough to cover a few hundred miles on foot if it gets that bad.
    • Entry/Escape tools: what happens if you're on the 40th floor when it catches fire? Nutnfancy might be crazy, but his idea of having repelling gear or a parachute and experience base jumping is absolutely sound. Same with prybars or an axe/hatchet to GTFO out a building where you're trapped. Or bolt cutters to get through fences. Think about where this is and where you need to go, and plan & prepare accordingly.
    • Resupply: At least enough ammo, batteries, water, food, and other consumables to completely replace what's on body in the unlikely event you used it all to get there.
    • Reinforcement: Since SAWC isn't as strict for a vehicle, if you have a place to put it...bigger/heaveir tools are an option. If you want to have armor and a long gun, this is the most appropriate place for it for most people. Obviously, pay some mind to how to store it securely and what will happen if you can't get to it. Have the equipment to carry more stuff once you get here if you have to leave on foot.

    Home: Level 4
    • Shelter: don't be 100% dependent on utilities. Be able to insulate and create heat/dryness on your own.
    • Food/Water: have enough for at least a few days or weeks for every member of your household, plus visitors/refugees if possible. For most small disasters, staying home if often preferable if the structure is sound.
    • Communication: mesh networking, HAM, etc.. Something to be able to communicate with your neighborhood and ideally family/friends in a different area to coordinate an evacuation if you decide it's necessary.
    • Transportation: Put some serious consideration in your bugout vehicle. I couldn't get my family out with enough gear and supplies to make a difference without at least a small SUV. I'm thinking a van or truck setup for overlanding might be in my future depending on how things go.
    • Resupply: all consumables. For weeks.
    • Reinforcement: no SAWC. If you want to mount an M249 on your roof, I'm all for it. But, if you don't have the people to man all the stuff (also water filtration, garden, etc.), you're going to have to leave. Can you take all that stuff with you, or are you giving looters a SAW?
    • Long-term supplies: washing and dealing with waste, garden, hunting for meat, filtering/treating large amounts of water...be able to stay there for a long time without utilities or services. If you can't, then you're leaving. And that's often more difficult.

    This is the level where you're really thinking long term. Do you have a group to evacuate to? Do you like and trust your neighbors? Can you heat the house without carbon monoxide poisoning? Can you repair your roof? Can you get a neglected vehicle running to leave? Can you keep morale up when there's "nothing to do"?

    By the time you get here, apart from food, water, shelter, and defense to keep you alive, your goal should be to find other people. Give them a place to go, or be able to go where they are.

    Each level lets you deal with worse and worse (or longer and longer) situations. All the way up to a complete collapse.

    Oddly enough, when I started thinking this way....my EDC actually got lighter. There's a lot of cargo space in my car that's taken up by default. But, there are options there if I need it. And I'm not carrying 3lbs of water on a normal day...because I can always drop a couple bucks at a store....until I can't....which is when the gear comes into play...with realistic expectations.

    Hope people got value out of that....
     
    #48 moostapha, Sep 18, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
  9. dmak

    dmak
    Expand Collapse
    into the wild i go, let fortune assist the daring
    Staff Member Global Mod

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    13,308
    Good food for thought.
     
    mctacticool, charliefox and moostapha like this.
  10. mctacticool

    mctacticool
    Expand Collapse
    Apocalypse Ready

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2014
    Messages:
    3,635
    Likes Received:
    10,991
    What i thought as well...
     
    moostapha likes this.
  11. sk33tr

    sk33tr
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Master

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2016
    Messages:
    835
    Likes Received:
    2,353
    to me, the most important thing in that whole thing is training and skills. without the training and/or the skills, all the gear in the world is going to do you a bit of good. you can have the best, most accurate gun in the world, but if you don't know how to shoot, then it does you no good. if you have the best personal trauma kit out there, none of the items in there will save a life if you don't know how to use any of it.

    so i've always been a very firm believer that training is the number 1 thing anyone needs. knowledge is, indeed, power. and that power will give you the skills, and hopefully the mindset, to use that knowledge properly and quickly.

    we're all human. we're all fallible to a degree. but being better prepared with knowledge can put you a step above. that's why cops, firemen, emts, military, etc. go through so much training. if they didn't, just anyone off the street could do the job and the world would be way worse than it is now.

    so whether you go to the range weekly or only a couple times a month, that training can help save your life or someone else's life.


    train...learn...apply...repeat...
     
    moostapha likes this.
  12. backwater-otter

    backwater-otter
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Grand Master

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    8,190
    So true, I need a lot more training and albeit more time to train.
     
    moostapha and mctacticool like this.
  13. Gpwelding1

    Gpwelding1
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Journeyman

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    54
    OUTSTANDING moostapha!!!
    This post alone should be a sticky!!!
     
    moostapha and dmak like this.
  14. moostapha

    moostapha
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Master

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    3,409
    Thank you. I re-read it and remembered what I put into developing that. I appreciate your kind words.

    If I could adapt it at all, I'd place even less importance on food until you bug in or bug out long term. The only things I personally include in anything mobile now are non-food tasty things that don't cause an insulin response and don't break a fast...think black coffee and herbal tea, plus salt and vitamins.

    I've been doing more research and experimentation on fasting for health benefits, and I'm well over 90% sure that while I would collect and preserve food in a disaster, it would be several days before I actually ate anything but water, vitamins, salts, and coffee/tea as a morale boost.

    Assuming you're in decent health and don't have a model's or bodybuilder's sub-10% body fat, the hormonal changes that happen when you're fasting are a net benefit (there is some difference between men and women due to how / why the biological sexes store fat and how exactly sex hormones work, but it's not a huge difference).

    After 12-24 hours of fasting, a lot of things start happening. Your body basically floods itself with HGH, testosterone or progesterone, and endogenous anabolic steroids, specifically to preserve lean muscle mass and keep you capable of fighting, hunting, and gathering food. Your energy levels go up drastically at around 48-72 hours. Your cells start an autophagy process that effectively removes damaged / diseased cells and allows them to be replaced by healthy ones. Inflammation decreases. White blood cells and lymphocytes get replaced in what a lot of people call an immune system reset. While there is a spike in the first 18 hours, your body reduces stress hormones. And hunger hormones pretty much go away....after ~48 hours, unless you're under weight, you're just not hungry anymore. The hunger comes back days later when you actually need sustenance, and you'll pretty naturally crave the nutrients your body needs. Because your body is smarter than you are.

    It also seems like most people can fast for a lot longer than almost anyone thinks. You lose about half a pound a day when fasting. So, if you're 20lbs overweight, you can expect to fast for 40 days with no ill effects, as long as you're getting the water, salt (sodium, potassium, magnesium, chloride, etc...NOT table salt, which is NaCl, sugar, and anti-caking compounds), and other vitamins your body needs to function normally.

    Fwiw, there's no longer food in my car. It's just at home and in my bug out location.

    I'm also on day 3 of a planned 5-day fast right now. This feeling is great.

    Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
     
    dmak and Gpwelding1 like this.
  15. Gpwelding1

    Gpwelding1
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Journeyman

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    54
    I have tried fasting myself. After a couple of days, the only ill effect I saw was headache. However, that could have been due to me not taking vitamins as you recommend. I believe I will try it again and see if that makes a difference as far as the headaches.
     
    dmak and sk33tr like this.
  16. sk33tr

    sk33tr
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Master

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2016
    Messages:
    835
    Likes Received:
    2,353
    i gotta tell ya...if i had to go without food for a few days, it would REALLY suck. just going about 5-6 hours without food causes me to have a bad headache. then, if i don't eat soon, i wind up getting sick and throwing up. i've had that happen a few times and it is not fun, at all.

    but.....i guess if i absolutely HAD to do it, i could endure and push through it if it meant doing other things necessary to survive.
     
  17. moostapha

    moostapha
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Master

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    3,409
    It's a salt and water thing.

    It's insanely important. Fasting or Keto without enough salt eventually causes flu like symptoms; muscle tremors, weakness and lack of control; dizziness; and compounded dehydration.

    Part of it is that it takes a lot of water to process carbs, so your body holds onto more of it when you've eaten carbs recently.

    A lot of it is because the kidneys react to fasting by flushing a lot of your water, and the salts dissolved in it, out of your body. You have to replace both pretty aggressively. I drink almost 2 gallons of water some days. Minimum is a little over 1.

    Those two things together make it easy to frack up your salt / water balance.

    In addition to daily vitamins, I don't really drink anything anymore without an electrolyte additive and/or a pinch of himalayan pink salt. If you screw up and put way too much in, you throw up. But, it's relatively easy to deal with.

    As for the last fifty years or so of the government and doctors correlating salt intake with high blood pressure....my research has at best been inconclusive. And my experience has been the opposite. I get a good bit more salt per day than the recommended maximum, but I also basically don't eat carbs (some in fruit, some in my weekly hibachi/sashimi from sauces though I don't eat rice, a small amount in French onion dip on pork rinds, a trivial amount in the farm to table bacon I get). A keto diet when I eat plus fasting combined with a lot of salt has my already low-normal blood pressure quite low.

    I'm also neither a doctor nor a research scientist. Please do your own research before making any serious changes. But my research has led me to ignore the last 70 years or so of nutritional advice, my health is improving, and I've never felt better.

    FWIW, I started doing this research because I was curious and started noticing responses to sugar that I didn't like. I made the change a couple months ago after finding out I was a type 2 diabetic. And....the changes are 100% positive. Comparing my blood glucose measurements to other T2 diabetics is shocking, and I'm down 20lbs...people (including other dudes) are starting to ask about it.

    I'm convinced that this diet / fasting can control it without medication or insulin, and there's some research showing it has the potential to flat out cure it. I know 2 people IRL and have read case studies that cured stage 4 cancer without treatment by doing something similar. And the last 10,000 years of human history show a lot of evidence that people just flat out were not built to eat every day, that we're not built to eat carbs in any real quantity at all, and that people have been doing extended fasts for religious reasons pretty much since the invention of religion.

    It's really interesting....you know, if you're at all into biohacking or reading really dry academic research.

    Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
     
    #57 moostapha, Jun 14, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
    dmak and Gpwelding1 like this.
  18. Gpwelding1

    Gpwelding1
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Journeyman

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    54
    Tell me more about this Himalayan pink salt please. What is a good source to get it from and how often do you drink something with a pinch of it in it.
    Also, what electrolyte additive do you use?
     
    dmak likes this.
  19. moostapha

    moostapha
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Master

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    3,409
    So, normal table salt is just sodium chloride, usually with sugar and other anti-caking agents.

    HPS (sick of typing it) also contains calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper, iron, and other trace minerals.

    I get mine from the grocery store.

    I use the LyteShow electrolytes, which I got from amazon. Mostly because it comes with a little travel bottle. If I follow it's instructions, the taste is too salty for me, so I mostly drink out of glasses and add a 3-6 drops (depending on the size of the glass) often with a small pinch of the HPS as well. I mostly go by taste. It shouldn't taste like sea-water, but it's stronger than smart water, which is what I get at gas stations when I'm out of the house.

    At this point, I only drink coffee in the mornings, occasionally herbal tea in the afternoon (both with small doses of HPS/electrolytes), and water all day. Almost all of the water has the HPS/electrolytes.

    But, in addition to needing the minerals, I'm also trying to retain some water. I haven't had significant carbs or sugar since the beginning of April, and that makes it easier to become dehydrated. I have a scale that estimates (among other things) water weight, which stays around 60-61% when I'm doing it. If I skip a day it drops a little and I feel sick.

    If you don't get enough, the most obvious symptoms are a puffy face and a feeling of disconnect between your mind and your muscles, tremors, and lethargy. If you get too much, if your kidneys are relatively normal, they'll filter it out. If you get WAY too much, you'll get symptoms kind of like food poisoning without the lethargy. It's unpleasant but not too harmful at that level, as far as I can tell.

    The WhatIveLearned and Thomas DeLauer YouTube channels have a good amount of introductory information and sources for deeper research. Dr. Jason Fong also has some information out about the basics of diet / fasting regimens like what I'm using.

    Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
     
  20. Gpwelding1

    Gpwelding1
    Expand Collapse
    EDC Journeyman

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    54
    Ok, thanks for that information. I'll see if I can find the HPS and I'll check those out on YouTube.
     

Share This Page