Safety Glasses vs Angle Grinder

dmak

into the wild i go, let fortune assist the daring
Staff member
Global Mod
#2
Holy cow. I think I need better eye jackets, I wear some cheapie Kobalts that I got. Those look heavy duty and got thrashed.

What's your suggestion for a good pair of shop/mechanic/shooting clear lenses?
 

EDCP-MIKE

Administrator
Staff member
Charter Member
#3
Holy cow. I think I need better eye jackets, I wear some cheapie Kobalts that I got. Those look heavy duty and got thrashed.

What's your suggestion for a good pair of shop/mechanic/shooting clear lenses?
Honestly, safety glasses that are both ANSI Z87.1 and Ballistic-Rated would be the ideal choice for your listed activities. One of the tests for ANSI involves an impact test with a velocity of 150 fps. The ballistic-rating tests ramp those speeds up to around 620-650 fps. There are other tests involved for both impact standards, but this gives you an idea of the differences. There are plenty of brands/styles that feature both certifications to choose from. Here's a link to all of the clear models we currently carry. It's a long list so let me know if you have any other questions. ;)
 
#4
Also, stop using 1/8" cutoff wheels.

Yes, I sound like "that guy". But, I am "that guy".

I had one of these 1/8 inch thick wheels let go on me. Once. The fella I work with uses them all the time, but he's never had one shrapnel in front of him.

If you are grinding off a bolt head that won't come loose any other way, you're fine. The peril of these things seems to be in the way you position the grinder, and the percentage of the wheel that's engaged with the work. If you can hold the grinder so that the wheel is spinning parallel to the floor, it's easier to keep it square and level. I would also say that if you've got 50% of the exposed wheel engaged with the work, you're asking for trouble.

The problems start to happen when you do what everybody does, swing the grinder over on it's side, and try to use it like a circular saw. For some reason, it's much harder to keep the grinder aligned with the cut. It's also much harder to keep it from diving into the cut and jamming, or kicking back out. Either one is bad for your soft parts.

Every tool comes with a tradeoff, obviously, and the "best" way to avoid these wheels turning into grenades is to use a different tool. But I understand the reason people like angle grinders, because I like them for the same reasons: cheap, and versatile.

Yes, obviously, wear your safety gear. But you will make your life much easier by using the 1/4" cutoff wheels. IMO, the tradeoff of a larger kerf is well worth how much more difficult it is to break that wheel.
 

dmak

into the wild i go, let fortune assist the daring
Staff member
Global Mod
#5
Also, stop using 1/8" cutoff wheels.

Yes, I sound like "that guy". But, I am "that guy".

I had one of these 1/8 inch thick wheels let go on me. Once. The fella I work with uses them all the time, but he's never had one shrapnel in front of him.

If you are grinding off a bolt head that won't come loose any other way, you're fine. The peril of these things seems to be in the way you position the grinder, and the percentage of the wheel that's engaged with the work. If you can hold the grinder so that the wheel is spinning parallel to the floor, it's easier to keep it square and level. I would also say that if you've got 50% of the exposed wheel engaged with the work, you're asking for trouble.

The problems start to happen when you do what everybody does, swing the grinder over on it's side, and try to use it like a circular saw. For some reason, it's much harder to keep the grinder aligned with the cut. It's also much harder to keep it from diving into the cut and jamming, or kicking back out. Either one is bad for your soft parts.

Every tool comes with a tradeoff, obviously, and the "best" way to avoid these wheels turning into grenades is to use a different tool. But I understand the reason people like angle grinders, because I like them for the same reasons: cheap, and versatile.

Yes, obviously, wear your safety gear. But you will make your life much easier by using the 1/4" cutoff wheels. IMO, the tradeoff of a larger kerf is well worth how much more difficult it is to break that wheel.
Funny as it sounds, I've got a project that I need to cut some metal and am planning on using my angle grinder. I'm picking up wheels this weekend and I'll be getting 1/4 per your recommendation. I don't know whick ones I would have gotten, but now I know not to get 1/8. Thanks for the tip.
 

sk33tr

EDC Master
#6
Also, stop using 1/8" cutoff wheels.

Yes, I sound like "that guy". But, I am "that guy".

I had one of these 1/8 inch thick wheels let go on me. Once. The fella I work with uses them all the time, but he's never had one shrapnel in front of him.

If you are grinding off a bolt head that won't come loose any other way, you're fine. The peril of these things seems to be in the way you position the grinder, and the percentage of the wheel that's engaged with the work. If you can hold the grinder so that the wheel is spinning parallel to the floor, it's easier to keep it square and level. I would also say that if you've got 50% of the exposed wheel engaged with the work, you're asking for trouble.

The problems start to happen when you do what everybody does, swing the grinder over on it's side, and try to use it like a circular saw. For some reason, it's much harder to keep the grinder aligned with the cut. It's also much harder to keep it from diving into the cut and jamming, or kicking back out. Either one is bad for your soft parts.

Every tool comes with a tradeoff, obviously, and the "best" way to avoid these wheels turning into grenades is to use a different tool. But I understand the reason people like angle grinders, because I like them for the same reasons: cheap, and versatile.

Yes, obviously, wear your safety gear. But you will make your life much easier by using the 1/4" cutoff wheels. IMO, the tradeoff of a larger kerf is well worth how much more difficult it is to break that wheel.
could not agree more with that part. a disc, designed to cut metal, that is spinning in excess of 5000 rpm will make quick work of your eye protection, your clothing, and definitely your skin if you're not careful. so using a thicker wheel can reduce the possibility of it breaking during use.

granted, i do use the thin wheels at times. but that's usually if i have to cut a small bolt or something i know will only take a few seconds. but if i have to cut something larger (rebar, lag bolts/screws, angle iron, etc.), then i switch to the thicker wheel and take my time.

and i ordered a couple pair of the safety glasses from the site Mike posted. i like them and they fit pretty well. i wear prescription glasses and they fit right over those with no issues. plus, i like that they have the retaining string on them so i can just take them off and let them hang around my neck when i don't need them right away but might later.
 

EDCP-MIKE

Administrator
Staff member
Charter Member
#7
could not agree more with that part. a disc, designed to cut metal, that is spinning in excess of 5000 rpm will make quick work of your eye protection, your clothing, and definitely your skin if you're not careful. so using a thicker wheel can reduce the possibility of it breaking during use.

granted, i do use the thin wheels at times. but that's usually if i have to cut a small bolt or something i know will only take a few seconds. but if i have to cut something larger (rebar, lag bolts/screws, angle iron, etc.), then i switch to the thicker wheel and take my time.

and i ordered a couple pair of the safety glasses from the site Mike posted. i like them and they fit pretty well. i wear prescription glasses and they fit right over those with no issues. plus, i like that they have the retaining string on them so i can just take them off and let them hang around my neck when i don't need them right away but might later.
Thank you. I'm glad your safety eyewear is working well for you. :cool:
 
Top