the wonderful word of nolaradio (now in Technicolor)

mctacticool

Apocalypse Ready
We got a little more than that overnight.

My neighborhood facebook has a thread about road conditions. Which is funny...because it hasn't been cold enough to freeze and won't get cold enough to freeze at least through tomorrow.

There are "slick" patches in parking lots where the slush builds up...if you'r dumb enough to turn the wheel hard and brake at the same time. It's enough that burnouts would be easy to do without serious tire damage but not enough to pose a danger unless you're an idiot.

The problem is that a lot of people are idiots. It wasn't that much worse than this when the whole city shut down for a week after the governor declared a state of emergency and sent everyone home...which turned a light snow into a catastrophe of a traffic jam that turned 45 minute comutes into 20 hour+ survival exercises and left abandoned cars on all of the interstates and highways for days.

For people not in the south...it's a different world down here when it comes to winter weather. Part of it is people over-reacting. A lot of it is that you have to go a long way to get any real practice driving in it. So, if the conditions are more slippery than rain, anyone who's kind of dumb and almost everyone driving a pickup truck is going to lose control either from not understanding that less input = better or because there's no weight over their rear wheels.

I've actually seen multiple people rear-end someone and try to explain it away by saying something like "I jammed the brakes and even pulled the hand brake and the car just kept going"....and the crazy thing is that I've seen cops rule it a no-fault accident (between one of those idiots and a parked car) because they didn't know any better. And about half of the times I've driven in snow down here, I've run a red light at some point because I saw a pickup truck coming towards me in the rear view....who jammed the brakes and didn't understand why his truck was all of a sudden going sideways.

Additionally, they just don't sell real winter clothing, houses aren't insulated properly, almost no one has backup heat of any kind, and the government overreacts to everything, which makes it worse. So, if it actually gets cold...people die in their homes from not understanding hypothermia.

I grew up in Minneapolis. Our heater went out jus about every winter, but we had a wood burning fire place. Mom's car was a Jeep that was 4x4...but needed a couple hundred pounds of sand in the back to keep it on the road. Every car had candles and blankets and ice picks and at least 12-hours worth of road flares and stuff....like everyone else's. Here...no one has any of that.

It really is a different world down here. I wonder if getting snow this early (it's usually in February or March) means we'll actually have a real winter. That could be interesting....
Just saw a motorjournalist on twitter check in from Atltanta and thought of you... I remember that news footage of a shutdown Atlanta, it was like a scene from the walking dead...

To me its just completely utterly stupid to not even do a little research about different weathers and driving conditions...
 

nolaradio

EDC Grand Master
Been a while since I've posted in this thread.

I'll have to get a picture of a current pocket dump soon. Been carrying pretty much the same things for the last few months.

Sent from the Bayou Bunker Command Center, Portable Unit #33, FEMA Region 6.
 

nolaradio

EDC Grand Master
It's a rainy day at work and we were supposed to have some pretty nasty weather move through. Had a good rain for a couple of hours but no heavy winds like they were predicting. So far it's been a letdown. But another band should be moving through within the hour. Been monitoring the local Skywarn net off and on while at work.



Sent from the Bayou Bunker Command Center, Portable Unit #33, FEMA Region 6.
 

Tabasco

New Member
It's a rainy day at work and we were supposed to have some pretty nasty weather move through. Had a good rain for a couple of hours but no heavy winds like they were predicting. So far it's been a letdown. But another band should be moving through within the hour. Been monitoring the local Skywarn net off and on while at work.



Sent from the Bayou Bunker Command Center, Portable Unit #33, FEMA Region 6.
I've been using a Nagoya Na-771 on my UV-5R with much improved reception over the factory antenna. For the price point, it's one less reason to put off getting a license. Great radios.
 

nolaradio

EDC Grand Master
I've been using a Nagoya Na-771 on my UV-5R with much improved reception over the factory antenna. For the price point, it's one less reason to put off getting a license. Great radios.
I have a few of the MFJ antennas that I use with some handhelds. But after reading your comment the other day, I looked into the price of the 771 on Amazon. There was a coupon available and I have a gift card balance burning a hole in my pocket so I pulled the trigger on two of them. Cost me just at $10 out of pocket.
Tried one out on the Baofeng this past weekend and seemed to work pretty well inside a car, travelling at 70 mph through torrential rain. Allowed me to monitor the Skywarn net.
 

nolaradio

EDC Grand Master
I know of a lot of people that like to crap on the Baofeng radios. Most of them have at least one of them too. They're too inexpensive to not get one. If it gets rained on, dropped or lost, it won't break the bank to replace. My only complaint is that they are so freaking light that I sometime forget that it's on my waist. I still use my Icom HT's when working public service events. I know how to program them easily in the field if needed.

The price of these little radios make them attractive to new licensees too. If you just got your tech license, you can get on the air for way less than $100. First HT I bought was about $225 and the first dual band mobile I bought was almost $400. I wish these inexpensive radios were around in 2001 when I got my ticket.
 
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