Winter vehicle EDC advice.

Paul M

EDC Journeyman
#1
Hey all, being in the Great White North, I thought I'd share some valuable advice I recieved years ago, particular to our winters and driving in them (the northern U.S. is not much different). A candle, with a vehicle window cracked open of course, can provide a great deal of heat and some light in case of a breakdown, accident, whatever, in the cold weather. A pack of emergency candles from a gas station or an auto parts store costs very little, but can do a lot. Same goes for inside any sort of makeshift shelter one may use if need be.

Just my piece of winter advice, having been on many winter exercises throughout myour career, without candles.
Oh, and matches or a lighter are good to have too...
Cheers,
Paul
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#2
I realize this post is old but great advice. I would reccomend a tin with multiple wicks for more heat and a stable platform. No worry about dripping wax!!
 
#4
Sound advice.

Winter survival was a part of public school cirricula in Minnesota. Including practice. I still remember building a little 2-person snow pile shelter. A single candle got it up to like 60 degrees in there when it was just over zero (F) outside.
 

mctacticool

Apocalypse Ready
#5
With winter coming its good that this thread got a bump...

The winters here doesn't really get that bad but i have knockoff maxtrax's, a snow shovel, towrope and woolblanket for my winterkit... That might change if i end up doing vehicle based surveillance in the wintermonths again...
 
#6
Fortunately, in GA, winter survival isn't much of a topic of discussion. If we have winter issues, the biggest part of it is the traffic jam.

A few years ago, we got a couple inches of snow, the government declared a state of emergency and sent everyone home, and people were stuck on the roads for the next 12 hours. A few people died of hypothermia and a few babies were born on the side of the interstate. Emergency services were pretty much nonexistent.

Mrs. Moo's office put everyone up in a hotel that was really close to where they were, and I was basically eating whatever was in the house and hanging out on IRC with 56k internet for several days. When I finally took my cyclocross bike out to try and get supplies, the roads were fine, but nothing was open.

If you actually have winter where you live, blankets, bivvys, a little food and water (if you have some way to keep it from freezing) or ways to melt, filter, and decontaminate snow are a good idea. Also candles, as mentioned above. And road flares. Definitely a few hours worth of road flares.

It sucks being stuck on the side of the road, car mostly covered in snow, and see someone coming by. You don't know whether they're going to help you or drive into you.
 
#7
For winters here just north of Syracuse NY I keep a couple extra fleece jackets hats and gloves in my car. Lately I just leave everything in year round. In one of my trunk bags are some tealight candles and several sources to light them ( matches, bic lighter, and a fire steel. ) I had a pair of knockoff Maxtrax in my car and they broke first time I used it in my driveway. The ones to the left in the picture.
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by KF 51141, on Flickr
 

mctacticool

Apocalypse Ready
#8
For winters here just north of Syracuse NY I keep a couple extra fleece jackets hats and gloves in my car. Lately I just leave everything in year round. In one of my trunk bags are some tealight candles and several sources to light them ( matches, bic lighter, and a fire steel. ) I had a pair of knockoff Maxtrax in my car and they broke first time I used it in my driveway. The ones to the left in the picture.
018
by KF 51141, on Flickr
I've used my knockoff maxtrax more in spring/fall seasons than winter, they work well in mud too...
 
#9
I've used my knockoff maxtrax more in spring/fall seasons than winter, they work well in mud too...
I have yet to use the ones pictured on the right. At least those are solid so I don't think they'll break. I've been looking into tire chains and found a good pair somewhat cheap . Only problem is money is tight right now.
 

Sharaz_Jek

EDC Grand Master
#10
I'm going to have to pick up a set of those Maxtrax. I always used to use pieces of carpet and coal cinders.

I always have candles and a can of sterno. Nothing like a cup off coffee, tea, or hot cocoa to lift the spirits. I keep plenty to share with other motorists too. Got stuck between two snow slides once with a few motorists. It was nice to be able to sit around and drink hot beverages with the few motorists who got stuck with me.
 
#11
I drive a lot all year round, and a lot of miles. The winter gear I carry in my truck is a full pack. It includes: down sleeping bag, water, granola and chocolate bars, candles, fire starter, water purifier, tool kit, rain gear, hat, gloves, and scarf.
 
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